Dr. Heidi Broadley (V13)

Shelter Medicine Program
What is shelter medicine?
Students prepare for spay/neuter clinic

Shelter Medicine is a field of veterinary medicine dedicated to the care and needs of underserved animals. At Tufts, the Shelter Medicine Program works with underserved animals such as community cats, shelter animals and animals belonging to pet owners in need, while teaching students practice-ready skills. A host of area partners work with the school to provide opportunities for students to observe and gain experience working in shelters in Massachusetts. Learn more…

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Alumni Profile: Dr. Heidi Broadley (V13)

Dr. Heidi Broadley (V13)Current role:

An Associate Veterinarian (Small Animal Vet) at Animal Health Center in Rochester, NH, Dr. Broadley also volunteers weekly at the MSPCA at Nevins Farm Animal Shelter in Methuen, MA.

"In my paid job, I see routine wellness and medical appointments, and I perform surgeries. At the MSPCA, I also perform surgeries and help with physical exams on the varied animals they see in the small animal shelter. Occasionally, I help the large animal staff there with paperwork, because I have my federal accreditation, or other tasks. A recent favorite was rounding up goats from a hoarding case, for castration!"

Favorite aspect of job:

While she enjoys feline surgeries, geriatric pet exams & the educational aspects of her position, Dr. Broadley particularly enjoys hearing from her patients’ human siblings as well.

"I love getting kids involved in their pets' exams by allowing them to listen to the heart and lungs, helping check the eyes and ears and then giving me their input!"

Background:

Prior to her time at Tufts, Dr. Broadley worked at the MSPCA for 10 years in various capacities, including as an adoption counselor, humane education coordinator and veterinary assistant.

"I've always felt that this is an incredibly rewarding field, despite its many challenges. I went to veterinary school with the goal of working in Shelter Medicine, and I hope to continue on this path long-term."

Kudos for Cummings School:

Dr. Broadley says that, both in private practice and in shelter work, she encounters many people with limited finances for veterinary care.

"My time at Tufts helped me develop connections and learn about resources to help these families."

Advice for students interested in Shelter Medicine:

Dr. Broadley says that visiting local shelters, and volunteering will provide students with a sense of the issues these animals face.

"I would also recommend attending Massachusetts Animal Coalition meetings, which are held on campus. They are an incredibly useful way to meet those dedicated shelter workers in the trenches and learn about hot-button concerns. The New England Federation of Humane Societies has a conference each spring, yet another way to network and explore various shelter-related topics."

Memory of Shelter Medicine at Cummings:

"One of my favorite Shelter Medicine electives involved visiting eight different shelters, interviewing staff and developing a portfolio that included materials from each facility. The experience made me develop an even greater appreciation for how progressive this area of the country is when it comes to animal sheltering, as well as the need for us to continue to reach out to areas that aren't as fortunate. In my private practice work, I see many adopted pets, some of which were transports from the South. The experiences I've had through my shelter work have definitely enhanced my practice work as a result, and for that I'm extremely grateful."

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SHELTER MEDICINE PROGRAM?