Jeffrey Mariner

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RSS Articles Featuring Dr. Mariner

  • The Fight Against Goat Plague
    A Cummings School researcher is looking to wipe out a viral illness that threatens both endangered species and the livelihoods of families in the developing world An endangered subspecies of antelope that roamed the earth at the same time as woolly mammoths now hovers on the brink of extinction as a disease that normally affects […]
  • Cat Tracking in Thailand
    Step one: Learn everything about liver flukes. Step two: Buy a plane ticket to Thailand. Step three: Track cats. Source: http://cummingsvoices.tufts.edu/2016/12/cat-tracking-in-thailand/
  • Race to kill animal plague begins
    Jeffrey Mariner comments on a global campaign to eradicate goat- and sheep-killer PPR (peste des petits ruminants) by 2030.
  • Race to stamp out animal plague begins
    Jeffrey Mariner comments on a global campaign to eradicate goat- and sheep-killer PPR (peste des petits ruminants) by 2030.
  • Got Microbes?
    Veterinary student finds bacteria present in unpasteurized milk from across southern New England - See more at: http://now.tufts.edu/articles/got-microbes#sthash.EZ9EVwUy.dpuf

Jeffrey Mariner

V87, DVM, PhD Epidemiology

Jeffrey Mariner
Jeffrey Mariner V87, DVM, PhD Epidemiology

Dr. Jeffrey Mariner, V87, is an IVM heavy weight. Best known for his work eradicating rinderpest, he has spent the past three decades tackling infectious diseases in livestock around the world. A man of many talents, Mariner is as skilled in the laboratory as he is in the field.  He’s as adept at humping a backpack full of heat-stable vaccines over a mountainous desert as he is at pushing policy reform across a political landscape.

Over the course of his career, Mariner has seen the field of IVM evolve. As a veterinary student at Cummings School in the 1980s, Jeff was influenced by the work of his professors and mentors, who championed a collaborative approach to working with communities in the developing world, engaging local health workers as partners, transforming them into stakeholders instead of receivers.

Mariner continues this legacy by using innovative approaches while working with interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary teams to eradicate his next target: Pest de Petits Ruminants (PPR). Whether he’s in the lecture hall, in the lab, or in the field, Mariner is always ready to help students interested in the field of Domestic Animal Health in IVM, after all, there is more work to be done!

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