Guest Faculty from other top Colleges and Universities

BernsteinAri Bernstein, MD, MPH
Acting Associate Director
Harvard Center for health and the Global Environment
Email: aaron_bernstein@hms.harvard.edu
URL: http://www.chgeharvard.org/about/people/aaron-bernstein

Dr. Bernstein practices pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston. His work examines the human health dimensions of global environmental change, such as climate change and biodiversity loss, with the aim of promoting a deeper understanding of these subjects among policy makers, educators, and the public.


BoschIrene Bosch, MPH, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Visiting Scientist at MIT, Beth Israel Medical Center and the Broad Institute
Email: ibosch@MIT.EDU

Dr. Irene Bosch is a visiting scientist at M.I.T. and also an adjunct professor at Mt. Sinai University in New York.  Dr. Bosch is an expert in dengue virus, and has traveled and collaborated extensively in the Americas to study dengue virus biology. Dr. Bosch research interests are to understand the pathogenesis of human RNA viruses, specifically flavivirus dengue and West Nile virus. She graduated from Harvard University, where  she focused her studies on molecular biology of parasites, after that she did post-doctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, in Boston, where she worked on cancer research and on gene expression studies and differential display in cancer cells, and in conjunction with the Department of Human Retrovirology studying cytokine chemokine responses to HIV.


Brown_MMark T. Brown, PhD
Environmental Engineering Sciences
University of Florida
Email: mtb@ufl.edu
URL: http://www.ees.essie.ufl.edu/homepp/brown/

Dr. Mark Brown is Professor of Environmental Engineering Sciences and Program Director of the Center for Environmental Policy at the University of Florida. He is also currently Acting Program Director of the Howard T. Odum Center for Wetlands. Professor Brown is a systems ecologist, whose research focuses on several areas that can broadly be described as natural resource management, including systems ecology, wetlands ecology, ecological engineering, environmental policy and energy analysis. He has served as consultant on development and sustainability issues to the USEPA, USAID, UNEP, and numerous governments and private consulting firms worldwide. For six years Dr. Brown was consulting ecologist to The Cousteau Society working with their research teams to develop appropriate solutions to a wide array of resource management problems that affect marine resources throughout the world. Current research includes projects to develop ecological indicators of ecosystem health, sustainable technologies for pollutant removal from surface waters, evaluation of the greenhouse gas emissions from alternative transportation, and modeling the impacts of nutrient enrichment in Florida watersheds. He is the author of over 100 peer reviewed journal articles, 2 books, and 24 book chapters. In his career at UF he has mentored 21 PhD students and 30 master’s degree students.


Bueno-PadillaIrene Bueno-Padilla, DVM, MPH
Veterinary Resident-Graduate Program
University of Minnesota
Email: Bueno004@umn.edu
URL: http://profiles.ahc.umn.edu/display/235390

Dr. Irene Bueno-Padilla graduated from the University of Cordoba Veterinary School (Spain) in 2007 and then moved to the University of Minnesota for an internship at The Raptor Center, and then a combined residency and Masters in Public Health (MPH) with an Ecosystem Health focus. In collaboration with the EcoHealth Alliance, her MPH project was a risk analysis on the public health risks from wild rodent imports from Latin America into the U.S. Currently, she is enrolled in the Veterinary Medicine PhD program at the University of Minnesota, working with Dr. Dominic Travis and others in the Ecosystem Health group. Her focus is on Epidemiology, and she plans to continue her research career on risk analysis, public health and wildlife conservation.


CalabreseEdward Calabrese, PhD
Environmental Health Science
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Email: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu

Research and publications in environmental toxicology; emphasis on biological factors (i.e. genetic and nutritional factors) which enhance susceptibility to pollutant toxicity.


DizardJan E. Dizard, PhD
Adjunct Professor, Center for Animals and Public Policy,
Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
Adjunct Professor, Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Charles Hamilton Houston Professor in American Culture (Sociology) and Co-Chair of Environmental Studies, Amherst College
Email: jedizard@amherst.edu
URL: https://www.amherst.edu/people/facstaff/jedizard

Dr. Jan Dizard received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago.  For the past twenty years, his research and teaching has focused on the changes in the perceptions of nature that western societies have experienced.  He has written on environmental conflicts over hunting, forestry, and endangered species.  His current project explores the emergence of conservation biology and restoration ecology and what that has meant for how ecologists conceive nature. In addition, he is working to get an environmental studies program established in Amherst’s curriculum.


FeffermanNina H. Fefferman, PhD
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources
Rutgers University
Email: fefferman@aesop.rutgers.edu
URL: http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~feffermn/

I am interested in the application of mathematical and computational models to biological systems. In my research, I work on a broad variety of systems, both in my own lab and in collaboration with others at many different institutions. My research usually falls into one or all of three categories: Epidemiology, Evolutionary & Behavioral Ecology, and Conservation Biology. I am interested in the effects of animal behavior, ecology and infectious disease epidemiology on one another. I model disease in both human and animal populations, and am interested in how disease and disease-related behavioral ecology can affect the short-term survival and long-term evolutionary success of a population. Some of my current projects focus on the modeling of endangered populations of tortoises to determine effective courses of management, social insect populations and their susceptibility to pathogens based on their behavior and nesting ecology, the effects of stress on populations in fluctuating environments, and how best to maintain human societal infrastructure in the face of pandemic disease.


FosterJeffrey Foster, PhD
Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics
Northern Arizona University
Email: jeff.foster@nau.edu
URL: http://www.mggen.nau.edu/jfoster/Site/Home.html

I am a biologist studying disease ecology, conservation, invasion biology and evolution. I am currently a Research Assistant Professor at Northern Arizona University. I have a BA in Biology from Northwestern University and a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. I conduct my research on diverse taxa at multiple ecological scales, from the phylogenetics of bacterial pathogens to landscape-level patterns of bird abundance. My initial research included Hawaiian bird conservation and population ecology of introduced birds. My current work is on a variety of projects, including white-nose syndrome in bats, brucellosis in wildlife and livestock, castor beans, and avian cholera in waterfowl. My approaches use population genetics, phylogenetics, and direct ecological studies.


FrenchRichard French, DVM, M.S., Ph.D.
Dean of Animal Studies and Allerton Chair of Animal Health Sciences
Division: School of Animal Studies
Office Location: Borger Academic Center
Email: richard.french@becker.edu

Dr. Richard French, D.V.M., is dean of the School of Animal Studies, and the Allerton Chair of Animal Health Sciences, at Becker College. A veterinary pathologist, Dr. French has served as an instructor and collaborator with the USDA, Plum Island Animal Disease Center for 10 years, as well as both the Agricultural Research Service and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Dr. French is an expert on zoonotic diseases, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, particularly those with public health significance like H1N1 and avian flu.  Previously director of the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Dr. French comes to Becker from the University of New Hampshire, where he supervised the pre-veterinary program, for which he was recently honored as academic advisor of the year; helped reorganize the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture; and helped lead development of a cooperative wildlife disease center involving Cornell University, Tufts University, the University of Connecticut, and the University of New Hampshire. Dr. French has also served as a tenured faculty at the University of Connecticut and as a pathologist in the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. Dr. French acquired his D.V.M. from the University of Illinois, and ran a small animal practice for several years before returning to the academic world. He received a master’s degree in parasitology and a doctoral degree in neuropathology, and he completed a residency in anatomic pathology. He is a member of the USDA National Animal Health Emergency Response Corps, and has authored numerous publications, including the first report of West Nile virus in the northern hemisphere (Science, 1999).


HicksDonna Hicks, MSW, PhD
Associate, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
Harvard University
Email: dhicks@wcfia.harvard.edu
URL: http://www.wcfia.harvard.edu/

Research Interests are developing theory and practice of unofficial diplomatic approaches to international and intercommunal conflict resolution; relationship between evolutionary forces and conflict; and the role dignity plays in healing and reconciling relationships in conflict.


KaufmanGretchen Kaufman, DVM
Adjunct Faculty & Assistant Director of Global Health Education & Training
Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health
Washington State University
Email: gkaufman@vetmed.wsu.edu
URL: http://globalhealth.wsu.edu/Our-Team/faculty/gretchen-e-kaufman

Dr. Kaufman was the first Director for the Masters in Conservation Medicine program at Cummings School. Her primary focus was on developing curriculum for the new program where she built environmental and conservation issues into the traditional veterinary program both within Tufts and in the wider veterinary education community. Currently, Dr. Kaufman is overseeing and developing the Allen School’s global educational programs.  She coordinates the Professional Certificate Program in Global Animal Health for WSU veterinary students interested in pursuing careers that address global health challenges at the human-animal interface. Dr. Kaufman works with the Allen School leadership team to develop additional graduate level teaching platforms that compliment and support the school’s research and outreach mission. Dr. Kaufman also works with educational partners, such as the University of Washington, to create innovative one-health teaching platforms and curricula that address the growing need for education and leadership in this area.   Dr. Kaufman has worked in Nepal since 2001.  She helped the veterinary school at the Institute for Agriculture and Animal Science put in place student-centered dog rabies prevention and surgical sterilization curriculum. With the support from a Fulbright award, she developed a wildlife and conservation medicine master’s course.  She has facilitated and mentored more than 20 joint Nepalese-American veterinary student research projects. Dr. Kaufman has also been working with government wildlife officials and local and international nongovernmental organizations to build capacity in wildlife health in Nepal.  This work has resulted in the government sanctioned Nepal Elephant Tuberculosis Control and Management Action Plan and the creation of several new wildlife veterinary positions.


KirshenPaul Kirshen, Ph.D.
Research Professor
University of New Hampshire
Email: Paul.Kirshen@unh.edu
URL: http://www.unh.edu/civil-engineering/dr-paul-kirshen

Dr. Kirshen has 30 years of experience serving as Principal Investigator/ Project Manager of complex, interdisciplinary, participatory research related to water resources and coastal zone management and climate variability and change. He is presently Research Professor, Environmental Research Group of Department of Civil Engineering, and Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH. Previous to that he served as Climate Change Adaptation Research Leader at Battelle Memorial Institute. From 1996 to 2009, he was Research Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Tufts University and Director and Co-founder of the Water: Systems, Science, and Society (WSSS) Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Program.  He is also a Lead Author for the 2014 Fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment and the 2013 US National Climate Assessment, is a member of ICLEI USA– Local Governments for Sustainability’s Climate Adaptation Steering Committee, and a member of the Massachusetts Climate Change Adaptation Advisory Committee and its Coastal Zone and Ocean Subcommittee. He was Project Manager/Principal Investigator of a $900,000 US EPA grant to investigate the integrated impacts of climate change on metro Boston and to develop recommendations for adaptation actions (CLIMB Project, 1999-2004). This included the infrastructure systems of transportation, water supply, wastewater management, energy demand, coastal and river flooding, public health and building integrity.  Recently, he was leader of a team investigating climate change coastal flooding impacts in the Northeastern US for the Union of Concerned Scientists.  Ongoing relevant projects include developing guidance tools for planning and management of urban drainage systems under a changing climate for US NOAA with Somerville MA as one of the case studies and also for US NOAA investigating the impacts of increased coastal flooding in East Boston MA and eastern shore of Maryland with particular emphasis on vulnerable populations and adaptation options. He is also part of teams conducting a national vulnerability assessment of US Army Corps of Engineers projects and programs, investigating municipal adaptation options to SLR in several New England municipalities using the COAST tool, and developing a drainage and sewer masterplan for Boston Water and Sewer Commission. He has also conducted water and climate management research in West Africa since 1974.


LeightonFrederick A. (Ted) Leighton, DVM, PhD, Dip. ACVP
Executive Director, Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre
Professor, Department of Veterinary Pathology
Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Email: ted.leighton@usask.ca
URL: http://www.ccwhc.ca/people_ted_leighton.php

Dr. Leighton is responsible for overall direction and administration of the CCWHC in consultation with staff and colleagues in all regions. His major focus of attention is wildlife disease surveillance and national and international disease management policy. He is a member of the permanent Working Group on Wildlife Diseases of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and is the Theme Leader for Chronic Wasting Disease for PrioNet Canada. He maintains a small research program on epidemic disease in Double-crested Cormorants and teaches aspects of wild animal health and disease to undergraduate and graduate students. His consuming interests are wildlife conservation and its place in sustaining ecological stability and human well-being within the limits of the biosphere. He has degrees from the University of Saskatchewan (DVM), Cornell University (AB, PhD) and Memorial University (Dip Ed.), and became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 1984.


NewellPeggy Newell, M.B.A., J.D.
Deputy Provost
Harvard University
Email: stephanie_underhill@harvard.edu
URL: http://provost.harvard.edu/people/peggy-newell

Peggy Newell joined the Office of the Provost in November of 2012 as Deputy Provost. She is responsible for strategic and tactical planning and management of all provostial activities, as well as advising the Provost on a wide array of administrative matters requiring executive decision-making. Initially, she will focus on supporting the campaign and planning for the Health and Life Science Center in Allston, with the goal of effectively planning, communicating, and implementing these important initiatives in ways that best serve the University. Prior to coming to Harvard, Peggy held a variety of positions over a thirty year career at Tufts University, most recently serving as Provost ad interim, Vice Provost, and Associate Provost for Research. Prior to joining the Provost’s Office at Tufts, she was Associate Dean of the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences and Associate Dean for Special Programs at Tufts University School of Medicine.


PortillaJulian Portilla, MS
Director, Masters Program in Mediation and Conflict Studies
Champlain College
Email: jportilla@champlain.edu
URL: http://www.champlain.edu/academics/our-faculty/portilla-julian

Julian Portilla’s work involves the design and implementation of community, environmental and political consensus-building processes and training programs, primarily in Latin America and the United States. Most recently based in Mexico, his primary responsibilities were managing several consensus-building processes on and around the Baja peninsula regarding fishing, environmental, and land development policy issues. In addition to his responsibilities at Champlain College, he is currently involved in a multi-stakeholder dialogue process to revise the Management Plan of the Loreto Bay National Park on the Baja Peninsula.  Julian has worked for the UN both as an organizational consultant and serves on the roster of Democratic Dialogue practitioners, assisting the UN to design and implement national dialogue processes in member states. In Vermont, Julian works with the Environmental Mediation Center and with social justice organizations such as Migrant Justice and Food for Farmers. Julian received his BA in Political Science at Vassar College and his Masters from the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University.


RabinowitzPeter M. Rabinowitz, MD
Associate Professor, Env. and Occ. Health Sciences (Primary department)
Associate Professor, Global Health
Adjunct Associate Professor, Allergy and Infectious Dis.
Email: peterr7@uw.edu
URL: http://deohs.washington.edu/faculty/rabinowitz_peter

Peter Rabinowitz MD MPH directs the Center for One Health Research. The Project explores linkages between human, animal, and environmental health in a “One Health” paradigm, including: zoonotic infectious diseases at the human-animal interface, animals as “sentinels” of environmental health hazards, and clinical collaboration between human health care providers and veterinarians in a species-spanning approach. A goal of the Project is to serve as an incubator and organizer of research, training, and clinical activities at the University of Washington related to the human-animal-ecosystem interface. Dr. Rabinowitz also directs the Canary Database, an online resource for evidence about animals as sentinels of environmental health threats from both toxic and infectious hazards. He has been a visiting scientist at the Global Influenza Program of the WHO, and also in the Animal Health Division of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) where he researched zoonotic diseases. He is the co-editor, with Lisa Conti DVM, MPH, of the clinical manual Human Animal Medicine: Zoonoses, Toxicants and other Shared Health Risks. (Elsevier 2010) He is co-director, with Malika Kachani DVM, PhD, of the Stone Mountain Working Group on One Health Proof of Concept Research. Dr. Rabinowitz completed a Family Medicine residency through the University of California San Francisco (Salinas Program). He has also completed fellowships in General Preventive Medicine and Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, where he served as Associate Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Director of Electives for the School of Medicine.


RobertsonCheryl Robertson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN
Associate Professor
School of Nursing
University of Minnesota
Email: Rober007@umn.edu
URL: http://www.nursing.umn.edu/faculty-staff/cheryl-robertson/index.htm

Cheryl Robertson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN is a Public Health Nurse, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota, and former Director of International Programs at the Center for Victims of Torture. She has pursued a pathway of scholarship, public health nursing practice, and service both nationally and globally. Her current work applies a strengths perspective to provide an understanding of refugee health, trauma, and coping in the aftermath of war and civil conflict. Building upon qualitative narratives and quantitative measures of psychosocial functioning among refugee youth and adults, she leads an interdisciplinary team in developing and testing community-based interventions to support healthy coping and healing among Somali and Oromo refugee communities. She is a university liaison in the Congo Basin for the USAID-RESPOND Emerging Pandemic Threats project, working at the interface of animal, environmental, and human health in Eastern and Central Africa.


RunstadlerJonathan Runstadler, DVM, PhD
Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering and Comparative Medicine
Doherty Professorship in Ocean Utilization
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Email: jrun@mit.edu
URL: http://web.mit.edu/be/people/runstadler.shtml

Dr. Runstadler seeks to understand genetic factors that impact susceptibility to infectious disease, specific or general and the repercussions for potential epidemics, persistence, and evolution of those infectious agents. His research is conducted within the context of the interactions that define the ecology between an infectious agent, the environment and the host. His focus is on the host/agent interaction and exploring a variety of approaches that may shed light on these interactions. His new research initiatives seek to break down traditional academic boundaries and bring together collaborative teams to address issues including the identification of disease vectors, the role of environmental change and pathogen persistence, population genetics and evolutionary biology, and the ecology of infectious agents.


SidorInga Sidor, DVM, MS
Assistant Clinical Professor, University of New Hampshire
Senior Veterinary Pathologist, New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
Email: inga.sidor@unh.edu
URL: http://mcbs.unh.edu/faculty/sidor

Dr. Sidor received her veterinary degree from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University in 1999, followed by an internship and research fellowship in wildlife medicine at the Tufts Wildlife Clinic, studying mortality of and environmental contaminant effects in the common loon (Gavia immer). After a residency and Master’s degree program in anatomic pathology at the University of Connecticut, Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, she was board-certified as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2004. From 2005-2008 she worked as a pathologist at the Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration, investigating brucellosis in marine mammals. Her current interests include investigation of wildlife zoonoses, development of molecular diagnostics for infectious diseases, environmental toxicology and immunology, and regional New England terrestrial, freshwater and marine wildlife pathology.


SmithKatherine Smith, PhD
Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Brown University
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
E-mail: Katherine_Smith@brown.edu
URL: http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Katherine_Smith

A member of the Brown faculty since July 2008, Kate received a BS in Biology from The University of New Mexico and a PhD in Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology from The University of California Santa Barbara. Before arriving at Brown, she was a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow with the EcoHealth Alliance. Kate is a Faculty Fellow of Brown’s Environmental Change Initiative, she sits on the Executive Board of the International Association for Ecology and Health, and is the founder of PetWatch.


TravisDominic Travis, DVM
Associate Professor, Veterinary Population Medicine
University of Minnesota
Email: datravis@umn.edu
URL: http://www.cvm.umn.edu/vpm/faculty/dominictravis/

Dr. Dominic Travis received a BS in Zoology at North Carolina State in 1992, a DVM from Michigan State in 1997, and an MS in Epidemiology from the University of Maryland in 2000.

Postgraduate work includes an internship at the USDA Plum Island Animal Disease Center (focused on foot and mouth disease and African swine fever), and Residency in Applied Epidemiology at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine.  From 2000-2010, he served as Veterinary Epidemiologist at the Lincoln Park Zoological Society (Chicago, IL), where he created a Research Center in Ecosystem Health, co-founding the Zoo Animal Health Network (ZAHN) in North America, the Gombe Ecosystem Health Project, and the Serengeti Health Initiative in Tanzania.  In 2008, he became Vice President of Conservation and Science at LPZ with oversight of five Research Centers consisting of over fifty scientific staff in North America, Latin America and Africa.  In 2010, he joined the UMN College of Veterinary Medicine Ecosystem Health Initiative as Associate Professor of Wildlife Epidemiology, with an adjunct appointment in the School of Public Health. His current research and teaching interests include epidemiology of emerging and zoonotic diseases, international/cultural collaboration in medicine, and exploring relationships between Biodiversity and Health.


UvinPeter Uvin, PhD
Provost
Amherst College
Email: puvin@amherst.edu
URL: https://www.amherst.edu/people/facstaff/puvin

Fletcher Academic Dean Peter Uvin, founding director of the Institute for Human Security and the Henry J. Leir Professor of International Humanitarian Studies The Fletcher School, will became the first provost of Amherst College, a role that he assumed in November 2012. He has written extensively on the intersection between human rights, development, and conflict resolution. He has been a frequent consultant to agencies working in Africa on these same issues. His 1998 book “Aiding Violence: The Development Enterprise in Rwanda” won the Herskovits Award for the most outstanding book on Africa. In 2006/7, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship, which led to his latest book “Life after Violence. A People’s History of Burundi” (2008). He also wrote a book on “Development and Human Rights” (2004). Dr. Uvin obtained his Licences in Diplomatic Science and in Political Science from the University of Ghent and his PhD in Political Science from Institut Universitaire de Hautes Etudes Internationales, University of Geneva.


WilcoxBruce Wilcox, MS, PhD
Adjunct Professor and Director Global Health Asia: Integrative Education and Research Program,
Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok
Visiting Professor, Tropical Disease Research Laboratory,
Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand
Email:

Dr. Wilcox earned A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from University of California at San Diego in biology and an M.S. in ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University. He pioneered research and education in integrative biology applied to biodiversity conservation and emerging infectious diseases, and is recognized as one of the founders of the fields of ‘conservation biology’ and ‘ecology and health’, serving as a founding editor and board member of their associations and journals Conservation Biology and EcoHealth (formerly Ecosystem Health). He has held faculty positions at Stanford University and the University of Hawaii, most recently, where he was Professor of Ecology and Health in the Departments of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. He conceived and ran Hawaii’s NSF IGERT project Ecology, Conservation and Pathogen Biology as PI and Director from 2006-2011. Currently, he leads an international team that conducts integrative research on emerging diseases and global health in Southeast Asia. Through Global Health Asia he also directs capacity-building projects and training for ecohealth and one health, collaborating with medical and veterinary schools in Asia and the US.